18.06.2018 Author: Phil Butler

Will Trump Destroy the World for His Statue?

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If the American president’s most recent moves have you puzzled again, take heart – the whole world is with you. The man evil billionaire George Soros now says is “perfectly willing to destroy the world in order to maintain his narcissism,” seems fully capable of doing just that.

Now we know we’ve entered the Twilight Zone of geopolitics, when the world’s evilest genius starts pointing fingers. But wait! Shortly after a smidgeon of truth exited Soros’ shriveled mouth Trump went haywire on the way back from the G7 Summit in Canada. New York Times reporters Peter Baker and Michael D. Shearframed Trump’s latest head wobbling tirade; Trump’s Blasts Upend G-7, Alienating Oldest Allies. The story goes something like this.

For weeks now the American president has been harping on imposing big tariffs on former allies around the world. What most experts deem his isolationist policy, is nothing of the sort in my view. But the fact that Trump shook hands with allies at the annual meeting of major world powers at the latest G7, and that he boaster of a “tremendously successful” meeting, set the stage for the Trump Twitter cannonade to follow. A scant 9 hours after having sealed a deal to mitigate US tariffs on Canada, Japan, and the Europeans, a tweetstorm of comments by Canada’s Trudeau sank those deals – and America’s credibility too boot. Trump called the Canadian PM “dishonest and weak” – and the world will soon call Trump the “deal buster.” The New York Times piece framed the situation (for once):

“Mr. Trump’s unvarnished post-summit Twitter insults aimed at Mr. Trudeau — “weak & dishonest,” “false statements,” “meek and mild” — left the Canadian-American relationship at its most overtly hostile since, perhaps, the War of 1812.”

To make matters worse, and even more confusing, Trump called for Russia to be rejoined with the G7 in the same breath. The loose cannon American leader showed a willingness to forget about the west’s whole “Crimea” madness, in favor of resetting business relations with Russia. But as positive as this footnote seems, American leadership shunning or shining to other nations on a whim destroys our credibility. But I believe Trump’s moves are calculating.

Stock 2

In a previous report by me I discussed the probability that Donald Trump and his constituents may be running game on the stock market. And before the G7 somebody starting buying General Motors like there was no tomorrow. The image above reveals the buying trend of the days leading up to the G7. And while I am not stock broker, previous experience assures me of one irrefutable fact – people who play the stocks will lie, cheat, steal, or even kill to get an edge. Americans who’ve worked for corporations with employee dividends and options know what I speak of. If my guess is correct, the trend above shows some people knew ahead of time how the G7 would turn out. Now Daimler and Toyota just got more expensive in America. Or did they?

If we assume for the moment that I am correct, then you can expect to see this tariff issue go back and forth, back and forth for a few weeks or months. This of course, would depend on how reactive the market is to Trump tweets continue to be over the policy. But what makes my new theory so interesting is the three dimensional potential for massive gains underneath. At this point we must ask ourselves, “What if all policy is manipulated for stock earnings wins?” What if the ruble is on Trump’s bet sheet for this week? The game I envision these billionaires playing is not limited to one-time financial wins. Trump is in Singapore now to meet with America’s supposed bitter enemy Kim Jong-un. So, if my hypothesis is correct, we can expect some unknown but somehow predictable sensationalism from this mini peace summit.

We cannot know what the bets are here. We are not in on the insider trading or the overall game. What we can monitor is a pattern. Let’s imagine that Trump was promised a Nobel Prize, let’s say, in order to feed the narcissism George Soros alluded to. In exchange for services rendered to the president’s people (not the public mind you), the big casino managers build his statue. I am just fantasizing and hypothesizing of course, for we cannot know the crisp reality. We do see the trend though, as I said. And for once I agree with George Soros – the stench of it smells like the end of the world.

Phil Butler, is a policy investigator and analyst, a political scientist and expert on Eastern Europe, he’s an author of the recent bestseller “Putin’s Praetorians” and other books. He writes exclusively for the online magazine “New Eastern Outlook.”


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